Dr Austin Tay

MUSING OF AN ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGIST


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https://www.linkedin.com/in/james-morley-kirk-b244443/

References for the research cited or mentioned in the podcast are below

  • Rosnow, R. L. (2001). Rumour and gossip in interpersonal interaction and beyond: A Social Exchange Perspective. In R. M. Kowalski (Ed.), Behaving badly: Aversive behaviours in interpersonal relationships (pp. 203–232). Washington, DC: APA.
  • Rosnow, R. L., & Georgoudi, M. (1985). Killed by idol gossip: The psychology of small talk. In B. Rubin (Ed.), When information counts: Grading the media (pp. 59–73). Lexington, MA: Lexington Books
  • Ben-Ze’ev, A. (1994). The vindication of gossip. In R. F. Goodman & A. Ben-Ze’ev (Eds.), Good gossip (pp. 11–24). Lawrence: University of Kansas Press.
  • Kurland, N. B., & Pelled, L. H. (2000). Passing the word: Toward a model of gossip and power in the workplace. Academy of Management Review, 25, 428–438.
  • Noon, M., and Delbridge, R. (1993). News from behind my hand: gossip in organizations. Organ. Stud. 14, 23–36. doi: 10.1177/017084069301400103
  • Dunbar, R. I., Marriott, A., and Duncan, N. D. (1997). Human conversational behavior. Hum. Nat. 8, 231–246. doi: 10.1007/BF02912493
  • Dunbar, R. I. (2004). Gossip in evolutionary perspective. Rev. Gen. Psychol. 8,100–110. doi: 10.1037/1089-2680.8.2.100
  • Foster, E. K. (2004). Research on gossip: taxonomy, methods, and future directions. Rev. Gen. Psychol. 8, 78–99. doi: 10.1037/1089-2680.8.2.78
  • Barkow, J. H. (1992). “Beneath new culture is old psychology: gossip and social stratification,” in The Adapted Mind: Evolutionary Psychology and the Generation of Culture, eds J. H. Barkow, L. Cosmides, and J. Tooby, New York, NY: Oxford University Press), 627–637.
  • Davis, H., and McLeod, S. L. (2003). Why humans value sensational news: an evolutionary perspective. Evol. Hum. Behav. 24, 208–216. doi: 10.1016/S1090- 5138(03)00012-6
  • Baumeister, R. F., Zhang, L. Q., and Vohs, K. D. (2004). Gossip as cultural learning. Rev. Gen. Psychol. 8, 111–121. doi: 10.1037/1089-2680.8.2.111
  • Duffy, M. K., Ganster, D. C., and Pagon, M. (2002). Social undermining in the workplace. Acad. Manag. J. 45, 331–351.
  • Baumeister, R. F., and Leary, M. R. (1995). The need to belong: desire for interpersonal attachments as a fundamental human motivation. Psychol. Bull. 117, 497–529. doi: 10.1037/0033-2909.117.3.497
  • Ellwardt, L., Labianca, G. J., andWittek, R. (2012). Who are the objects of positive and negative gossip at work? A social network perspective on workplace gossip. Soc. Netw. 34, 193–205. doi: 10.1016/j.socnet.2011.11.003
  • Aquino, K., and Thau, S. (2009). Workplace victimization: aggression from the target’s perspective. Annu. Rev. Psychol. 60, 717–741. doi: 10.1146/annurev.psych.60.110707.163703
  • Chandra, G., and Robinson, S. L. (2010). “They’re talking about me again: the impact of being the target of gossip on emotional distress and withdrawal,” in Paper Presented at the Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management, Boston, MA.
  • Waddington, K., and Michelson, G. (2007). “Analyzing gossip to reveal and understand power relationships, political action and reaction to change inside organizations,” in Paper Presented at the 5th International Critical Management Studies Conference, Manchester.
  • Bok, S. (1989). Secrets: On the Ethics of Concealment and Revelation. New York, NY: Vintage.
  • Grosser, T. J., Lopez-Kidwell, V., Labianca, G., and Ellwardt, L. (2012). Hearing it through the grapevine: positive and negative workplace gossip. Organ. Dyn. 41, 52–61. doi: 10.1016/j.orgdyn.2011.12.007
  • Kniffin, K. M., and Wilson, D. S. (2010). Evolutionary perspectives on workplace gossip: why and how gossip can serve groups. Group Organ. Manag. 35,150–176. doi: 10.1177/1059601109360390
  • Salmansohn, K. (2016). Think happy: Instant peptalks to boost positivity. Berkeley, CA: Ten Speed Press.
  • Danziger, E. (1988). Minimize office gossip. The Personnel Journal, 67, 31–35.
  • Porterfield, E. (2008). Gossip can be toxic to the workplace – And your reputation. The Seattle Times. http://www.seattletimes.com/life/ lifestyle/gossip-can-be-toxic-to-the-workplace-8212-and-yourreputation/.
  • Wu, L., Birtch, T. A., Chiang, F. F., & Zhang, H. (2018). Perceptions of negative workplace gossip: A self-consistency theory framework. Journal of Management, 44, 1873–1898. https://doi.org/10.1177/0149206316632057.
  • Kuo, C., Chang, K., Quinton, S., Lu, C., & Lee, I. (2015). Gossip in the workplace and the implications for HR management: A study of gossip and its relationship to employee cynicism. The International Journal of Human Resource Management, 26,2288–2307. https://doi.org/10.1080/09585192.2014.985329.
  • Foster, E. K. (2004). Research on gossip: Taxonomy, methods, and future directions. Review of General Psychology, 8, 78–99. https://doi.org/ 10.1037/1089-2680.8.2.78.


If you have enjoyed listening to this episode, please share this with your friends and colleagues. You can also put your reviews at Podchaser.

For any comments and suggestions, please send them via email to psychchat@omnipsi.com or tweet to psych_chat. Remember to subscribe to PsychChat on all good podcast platform. You can now find us on Vurbl.

Some of the research mentioned in this podcast are as follow:

1) Kets de Vries, M.F. (1998). Leadership in Organizations. INSEAD, Fontainebleau, France.  https://flora.insead.edu/fichiersti_wp/inseadwp1998/98-89.pdf

2) Zenger, J., & Folkman, J. (2020).  Research: Women are better leaders during a crisis. https://hbr.org/2020/12/research-women-are-better-leaders-during-a-crisis

3) Costa, P.T., Terracciano, A., & McCrae, R. R. (2001). Gender differences in personality traits across cultures: robust and surprising findings. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 81(2) 322-331. doi: 10.1037/0022-3514.81.2.322. PMID: 11519935. 4) Vianello, M., Schnabel, K., Sriram, N., & Nosek, B. (2013). Gender differences in implicit and explicit personality traits. Personality and Individual Differences 55, (994-999).
5) Del Giudice, M., Booth, T., & Irwing, P. (2012). The Distance Between Mars and Venus: Measuring Global Sex Differences in Personality. PLoS ONE, 7(1), e29265.


If you have enjoyed listening to this episode, please share this with your friends and colleagues. You can also put your reviews at Podchaser.

For any comments and suggestions, please send them via email to psychchat@omnipsi.com or tweet to psych_chat. Remember to subscribe to PsychChat in all good podcast platform. You can now find us on Vurbl.

Some of the research discussed in this podcast as follows

Duckworth, A. L.,  Peterson, C.,  Matthews, M. D.,  & Kelly, D. R. (2007). Grit: Perseverance and Passion for Long Term Goals. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Vol 92, No 6, 1087-1101.

Eskries-Winkler, L., Duckwork, A. L., Shulman, E. P., & Beal, S. (2014). The grit effect: Predicting retention in the military, the workplace, school and marriage. Frontiers in Psychology, 1-30.

Von Culin, K. R., Tsukayma, E., & Duckworth, A. L. (2014). Unpacking grit: Motivational correlates of perseverance and passion for long term goals. The Journal of Positive Psychology, 9:4, 306-312.

Zissman, C., & Ganzach, Y. (2020). In a representative sample grit has a negligible effect on educational and economic success compared to intelligence. Social Psychological and Personality Science, 1-8.

Credé, M., Tynan, M. C., & Harms, P. D. (2017). Much ado about grit: A meta-analytic synthesis of the grit literature. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 113(3), 492–511.

https://angeladuckworth.com/qa/#faq-152

What can I use the Grit Scale for?

I created the Grit Scale so that I could study grit as a scientist.  Why? Because you cannot study what you cannot measure.I also think this questionnaire is useful as a prompt for self-reflection. For example, some of the most effective coaches and teachers I know give this questionnaire to their players and students in order to prompt a conversation about their evolving passion and perseverance.

However, I hasten to point out that all psychological measures, including the Grit Scale, have limitations. You can fake a higher grit score without much effort, for example. Another very serious but not-so-obvious limitation of questionnaires is called “reference bias.” This distortion of scores comes from people holding different standards by which they judge behavior. So, your score not only reflects how gritty you are but also the standards to which you hold yourself. I talk about this limitation, among others, in this article on measurement which I co-authored with my friend and colleague David Yeager.

In sum, I think the Grit Scale can be used for research and for self-reflection, but its limitations make it inappropriate for many other uses, including selecting employees, admitting students to college, gauging the performance of teachers, or comparing schools or countries to each other.


I had the pleasure of recording this session with Dr Richard Mackinnon, Chartered Psychologist & Coach and  Managing Director at WorkLifePsych. He shared his insights and tips on wellbeing.

He can be contacted via 
https://www.linkedin.com/in/richardmackinnon/

If you have enjoyed listening to this episode, please share this with your friends and colleagues. For any comments and suggestions, please send them via email to psychchat@omnipsi.com or tweet to psych_chat.


Some of the references in this episode include:

1) Sheep, M. L. (2006). Nurturing the Whole Person: The Ethics of Workplace Spirituality in a Society of Organizations. Journal of Business Ethics, 66(4), 357–375.

2) “a psychological contract is a belief that an exchange partner is obligated to provide inducements, such as fair compensation, in exchange for one’s own contributions, such as loyalty or high quality work”. (Lee, Liu, Rousseau, Hui, & Chen, 2011; Rousseau & McLean Parks, 1993)

3) Henry Ford asked, ‘‘Why is it that I always get the whole person when all I really want is a pair of hands?’’ (Pollard, 1996, p. 25).



“There are three things extremely hard: steel, a diamond, and to know one’s self.” – Benjamin Franklin, Poor Richard’s Almanac, 1750.

Some to the references we mentioned in this episode include

Brewer, M. B., & Hewstone, M. (Eds.). (2004). Perspectives on social psychology.Self and social identity. Blackwell Publishing.

Mead, G.H. (1934). Mind, Self, and Society from the Standpoint of a Social Behaviorist. University of Chicago Press: Chicago.

Erikson, E.H. (1968). Identity: youth and crisis. Norton & Co.

McAdams, D. P. (1995). What do we know when we know a person? Journal of Personality, 63(3), 365–396.

If you have enjoyed listening to this episode, please share this with your friends and colleagues. For any comments and suggestions, please send them via email to psychchat@omnipsi.com or tweet to psych_chat.


We spoke a bit about Self Determining Theory. Below are some articles that you might find helpful to understand a bit more about the theory.

Ryan, R. M.; Deci, E. L. (2000). “Self-determination theory and the facilitation of intrinsic motivation, social development, and well-being”. American Psychologist. 55(1): 68–78.

Deci, E. L., & Ryan, R. M. (2012). Motivation, personality, and development within embedded social contexts: An overview of self-determination theory. In R. M. Ryan (Ed.), Oxford handbook of human motivation (pp. 85-107). Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.

Ryan, R. M. & Deci, E. L. (2017). Self-determination theory: Basic psychological needs in motivation, development, and wellness. New York: Guilford Publishing.

If you have enjoyed listening to this episode, please share this with your friends and colleagues. For any comments and suggestions, please send them via email to psychchat@omnipsi.com or tweet to psych_chat.


If you have enjoyed listening to this episode, please share this with your friends and colleagues. For any comments and suggestions, please send them via email to psychchat@omnipsi.com or tweet to psych_chat.

Some of the research mentioned in this podcast are as follow:

Self Indulgent Construal

Sirois, F. M., & Pychyl, T. (2013). Procrastination and the priority of short-term mood regulation: consequences for future self. Social and Personality Psychology Compass, 7, 115-127.
Tice, D.M., & Bratslavsky, E. (2000). Giving in to feel good: the place of emotion regulation in the context of general self-control. Psychological Inquiry, 11, 149-159.

Self Protective Strategy

Copes, H., Vieraitis, L., & Jochum, J.M. (2007). Bridging the gap between research and practice: how neutralization theory can inform reid interrogations of identity thieves. Journal of Criminal Justice Education, 18(3), 444-459.

Maruna, S., & Copes, H. (2015). Procrastination and dissonance- reduction strategies. Poster presented at the ninth biennial procrastination research conference. Bielefeld, Germany.
Sykes, G.M., & Matza, D. (1957). Techniques of neutralization: a theory of delinquency. American Sociological Review, 22, 664-670.
Self-Licencing

Blanken, I., van de Ven, N., & Zeelenberg, M. (2015). A meta-analytic review of moral licensing. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 41(4), 540-558.
De Witt Huberts, J. C., Evers, C., & De Ridder, D.T.D. (2011). Licence to sin: self-licensing as a mechanism underlying hedonic consumption. European Journal of Social Psychology, 42(4), 490-496.
Procrastination-Health Model

Sirois, F.M., Melia-Gordon, M.L., & Pychyl, T.A. (2003). “I’ll look after my health, later”: an investigation of procrastination and health. Personality and Individual Differences, 35(5), 1167-1184.

Research on Procrastination-Health Model

A cross-sectional study of students

Sirois, F.M., Melia-Gordon, M.L., & Pychyl, T.A. (2003). “I’ll look after my health, later”: an investigation of procrastination and health. Personality and Individual Differences, 35(5), 1167-1184.

Research on adults sample in the community

Sirois, F.M. (2007). “I’ll look after my health, later”: a replication and extension of the procrastination-health model with community-dwelling adults. Personality and Individual Differences, 43, 15-26.

Bedtime Procrastination

Kroese, F.M., Evers, C., Adriaanse, M.A., & de Ridder, D.T. (2014b). Bedtime procrastination: a self-regulation perspective on sleep insufficiency in the general population. Journal of Health Psychology. Doi:10.1177/1359105314540014.

Article – Now is not the Time for Precrastination

https://www.psychologicalscience.org/observer/now-is-not-the-time-for-precrastination