Dr Austin Tay

MUSING OF AN ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGIST


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Some of the research mentioned in this podcast are as follow:

Self Indulgent Construal

Sirois, F. M., & Pychyl, T. (2013). Procrastination and the priority of short-term mood regulation: consequences for future self. Social and Personality Psychology Compass, 7, 115-127.
Tice, D.M., & Bratslavsky, E. (2000). Giving in to feel good: the place of emotion regulation in the context of general self-control. Psychological Inquiry, 11, 149-159.

Self Protective Strategy

Copes, H., Vieraitis, L., & Jochum, J.M. (2007). Bridging the gap between research and practice: how neutralization theory can inform reid interrogations of identity thieves. Journal of Criminal Justice Education, 18(3), 444-459.

Maruna, S., & Copes, H. (2015). Procrastination and dissonance- reduction strategies. Poster presented at the ninth biennial procrastination research conference. Bielefeld, Germany.
Sykes, G.M., & Matza, D. (1957). Techniques of neutralization: a theory of delinquency. American Sociological Review, 22, 664-670.
Self-Licencing

Blanken, I., van de Ven, N., & Zeelenberg, M. (2015). A meta-analytic review of moral licensing. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 41(4), 540-558.
De Witt Huberts, J. C., Evers, C., & De Ridder, D.T.D. (2011). Licence to sin: self-licensing as a mechanism underlying hedonic consumption. European Journal of Social Psychology, 42(4), 490-496.
Procrastination-Health Model

Sirois, F.M., Melia-Gordon, M.L., & Pychyl, T.A. (2003). “I’ll look after my health, later”: an investigation of procrastination and health. Personality and Individual Differences, 35(5), 1167-1184.

Research on Procrastination-Health Model

A cross-sectional study of students

Sirois, F.M., Melia-Gordon, M.L., & Pychyl, T.A. (2003). “I’ll look after my health, later”: an investigation of procrastination and health. Personality and Individual Differences, 35(5), 1167-1184.

Research on adults sample in the community

Sirois, F.M. (2007). “I’ll look after my health, later”: a replication and extension of the procrastination-health model with community-dwelling adults. Personality and Individual Differences, 43, 15-26.

Bedtime Procrastination

Kroese, F.M., Evers, C., Adriaanse, M.A., & de Ridder, D.T. (2014b). Bedtime procrastination: a self-regulation perspective on sleep insufficiency in the general population. Journal of Health Psychology. Doi:10.1177/1359105314540014.

Article – Now is not the Time for Precrastination

https://www.psychologicalscience.org/observer/now-is-not-the-time-for-precrastination


If you have enjoyed listening to this episode, please share this with your friends and colleagues. For any comments and suggestions, please send them via email to psychchat@omnipsi.com or tweet to psych_chat.

Some of the research mentioned in this podcast are as follow:

Spector, P. E., & Fox, S. (2005). A stressor-emotion model of counterproductive work behavior. In S. Fox & P. E. Spector (Eds.), Counterproductive work behavior: Investigations of actors and targets (pp. 151–176). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Jex, S. M., & Beehr, T. A. (1991). Emerging theoretical and methodological issues in the study of work-related stress. Research in Personnel and Human Resource Management, 9, 311–365.

Spector, P. E. (1998). A control theory of the job stress process. In C. L. Cooper (Ed.), Theories of Organizational Stress (pp. 153–169). Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.

Sackett, P. R. (2002). The structure of counterproductive work behaviors: Dimensionality and relationships with facets of job performance. International Journal of Selection and Assessment, 10, 5–11. doi:10.1111/1468-2389.00189

Edmondson, A. (1999). Psychological Safety and Learning Behavior in Work Teams, Administrative Science Quarterly, Vol. 44, No. 2, pp. 350-383.

Dollard, M.F., Bakker, A.B., 2010. Psychosocial safety climate as a precursor to conducive work environments, psychological health problems, and employee engagement. Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology 83, 579–599.

Dollard, M.F., 2011. Psychosocial safety climate: a lead indicator of work conditions, workplace psychological health and engagement and precursor to intervention success. In: Biron, C., Karanika-Murray, M., Cooper, C.L. (Eds.), Managing Psychosocial Risks in the Workplace: The Role of Process Issues. Routledge/ Psychology Press..

Dollard, M.F., Bakker, A.B., 2010. Psychosocial safety climate as a precursor to conducive work environments, psychological health problems, and employee engagement. Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology 83, 579–599.

James, L.R., Choi, C.C., Ko, C.E., McNeil, P.K., Minton, M.K., Wright, M.A., Kim, K., 2008. Organisational and psychological climate: a review of theory and research. European Journal of Work and Organisational Psychology 17, 5–32.


If you have enjoyed listening to this episode, please share this with your friends and colleagues. For any comments and suggestions, please send them via email to psychchat@omnipsi.com or tweet to psych_chat.

Some of the research mentioned in this podcast are as follow:

  • Spector, P. E., & Fox, S. (2005). A stressor-emotion model of counterproductive work behavior. In S. Fox & P. E. Spector (Eds.), Counterproductive work behavior: Investigations of actors and targets (pp. 151–176). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.
  • Jex, S. M., & Beehr, T. A. (1991). Emerging theoretical and methodological issues in the study of work-related stress. Research in Personnel and Human Resource Management, 9, 311–365.
  • Spector, P. E. (1998). A control theory of the job stress process. In C. L. Cooper (Ed.), Theories of Organizational Stress (pp. 153–169). Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
  • Sackett, P. R. (2002). The structure of counterproductive work behaviors: Dimensionality and relationships with facets of job performance. International Journal of Selection and Assessment, 10, 5–11. doi:10.1111/1468-2389.00189.

  • Hobfoll, S. E. (1989). Conservation of resources: A new attempt at conceptualizing stress. American Psychologist, 44, 513–524. doi:10.1037/0003-066X.44.3.513.
  • Halbesleben, J. R.,&Buckley, M. R. (2004). Burnout in organizational life. Journal of Management, 30, 859–879. doi:0.1016/j.jm.2004.06.004.
  • Hobfoll, S. E. (2001). The influence of culture, community, and the nested self in the stress process: Advancing conservation of resources theory. Applied Psychology: An International Review, 50, 337–421. doi:10.1111/1464-0597.00062.
  • Fox, S., & Spector, P. E. (2006). The many roles of control in a stressor-emotion theory of Counterproductive Work Behavior. In P. L. Perrewe & D. C. Ganster (Eds.), Research in occupational stress and well being (pp. 171–201). Greenwich, CT: JAI. doi:10.1016/S1479-3555(05)05005-5.
  • Krischer, M. M., Penney, L. M., & Hunter, E. M. (2010). Can counterproductive work behaviors be productive? CWB as emotion-focused coping. Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, 15, 154–166. doi:10.1037/a0018349.
  • Penney, L. M., & Spector, P. E. (2007). Emotions and counterproductive work behavior. In N. M. Ashkanasy & C. L. Cooper (Eds.) Research companion to emotion in organizations, (pp.183–196). Northampton, MA: Edward Elgar Publishing.
  • Tunstall, M. M., Penney, L. M., Hunter, E. M., & Weinberger, E. (2006). A closer look at CWB: Emotions, targets, and outcomes. Poster presented at the annual meeting of the Society of Industrial and Organizational Psychology, Dallas, TX.


If you have enjoyed this episode, kindly share this with your friends. For comments and suggestions, please write to psychchat@omnipsi.com or tweet to @psych_chat.

If you are interested to know more about what OmniPsi Consulting offers, please click on the link www.omnipsi.com.

If you are interested in my blog, you can click on this link www.draustintay.com

As China Select has the publishing right for TD-12 in Asia Pacific regions, James is looking for collaborators for validation studies. If you are interested in doing so, please contact James directly through the link below:

https://www.linkedin.com/in/james-morley-kirk-b244443/


If you have enjoyed this episode, kindly share this with your friends. For comments and suggestions, please write to psychchat@omnipsi.com or tweet to @psych_chat.

If you are interested to know more about what OmniPsi Consulting offers, please click on the link www.omnipsi.com.

If you are interested in my blog, you can click on this link www.draustintay.com

To contact Jordi Escartin, Associate Professor of Organizational Behaviour, University of Barcelona, please click the link below

https://www.linkedin.com/in/jordiescartin/

 

Ask an Expert

 

I recently attended a webinar which advertised that the speaker is an expert in dealing with workplace toxicity. I was so looking forward to the webinar to listen to the speaker’s perspectives and research. I was all ears and ready to take notes. The webinar started with an introduction from the host and then the speaker. An anecdotal example was used by the speaker to elaborate on the circumstances of how workplace toxicity can take place. The focus of the story was how communication could create opportunities for toxicity in the workplace to happen.

 

Next, the speaker shared a qualitative study conducted with her clients about their experience of toxicity in the workplace. There was also a slide on how the various parts of the brain will light up when someone has experienced toxicity in the workplace. If you are still reading and feeling a bit confused, well, this was how I felt on the webinar. I frantically wrote some questions and sent them to the host. I waited patiently for the speaker to answer. One of my questions was asked but not answered. I must confess that some of my questions might not be questions per se; rather, they were observations about what the speaker had said. I needed the speaker to clarify what was said and shared. I reckoned that some of my questions were unanswered because there was not enough time?

 

I went back to look at the webinar description for the session and the speaker’s profile and think to myself that I might have registered for a wrong webinar. The speaker was supposed to have done years of research in this area, but all I heard were anecdotal evidence. There were questions I wanted answers to such as, “How can communication cause workplace toxicity?”, “What is the relationship between workplace toxicity and brain activity?”

 

Sadly, the webinar, to me, did not satisfy my expectations. Perhaps I need to lower my expectations when I sign up for any other webinar. However, one question remains – “Is it right to call yourself an expert when what you shared did not demonstrate any expertise at all?”

 

 

 


If you have enjoyed this episode, kindly share this with your friends. For comments and suggestions, please write to psychchat@omnipsi.com or tweet to @psych_chat.

 

If you are interested to know more about what OmniPsi Consulting offers, please click on the link www.omnipsi.com.

 

If you are interested in my blog, you can click on this link www.draustintay.com

 

You can check out the details of Dr Clara To, our featured guest,  below

Company website – http://talentlink.com.hk/
Linkedin Profile – https://www.linkedin.com/in/clarato/

3 As of Psychological Flexibility

 

It is very human of us to feel worried and be fearful because often we are caught up with ruminating the past and catastrophizing the future. When we are in such a state, we tend to lose ourselves in the present. Being caught up with our thoughts and emotions can result in us losing all sense of self-awareness. 

 

Creating Awareness

 

When we do not recognise how our behaviours are impacting us, we will be stuck in a rut, mulling over things over and over again. Such impact can result in us becoming depressed and frustrated. What should we do then? Take a step back, breathe and create a psychological distance from the thoughts or emotions, that is to do perspective-taking. In doing so, we allow ourselves to see the reasons why we think and feel a certain way, thus providing CLARITY. Next, we will need to notice how these thoughts or emotions can affect us. In doing so, we can decide as to whether we want to carry on allowing these thoughts and feelings control how we behave.

 

Learning To Accept 

 

It is awful to feel defeated or not being able to take control of our lives. The society imposes a standard, and we adhere religiously to it, believing that FAILURE is not an option. So we will create automatic defence mechanisms such as being positive, trying hard to find out what went wrong or simply not facing the failure. These defence mechanisms have their shortcomings. For example, when we are always positive when dealing with failures, we can become too cavalier and ignore the real causes of our failures. On the other hand, when we spend too much time fretting over details about how and why we fail, we only stop ourselves from moving forward. Similarly, when we run away and not face what is before us, it will catch up with us. What can we do then? Accept that failure is normal; all of us fail at one point in our lives. What matters is how we move forward from our failures.

 

Action

 

Now that we are aware how our thoughts and emotions can get in the way we function and accept that sometimes we do not have any control about the situation we are in, we need to put into action what to do next. We need to think about what are the important things in our lives. We need to have an action plan to help us move towards those important things and be mindful of potential hurdles that can waylay the plan. Remember, this is a process and not a straight point A to point B journey. We need to be agile and adaptable should change to the action plan is required.

 

Practice 

Just as it takes determination and tenacity to keep ourselves physically fit, it is not that dissimilar when it comes to our psychological health. The more we practice, the better we will become; similarly, when we become lax, we become unfit psychologically.