Dr Austin Tay

MUSING OF AN ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGIST

Being grateful

 

 

Reading news and articles about what is happening in the world, basing on the number of deaths and infection from COVID-19, there is no doubt that all countries are doing their best to slow down the spreading of the virus.

 

Most of us are very lucky to have a roof over our heads that we can isolate ourselves. Yes, we have to change our lifestyle to accommodate what we are all experiencing. Some lament about this new norm and flagrantly flout restriction measures in the name of freedom. We see how some celebrities are having meltdowns or behaving foolishly, trapped in their comfortable mansions while others are using their platform to encourage people to think about the needy.

 

I am grateful that the country that I live in has relatively low numbers of infections as compared to some other countries. While it is very easy to be caught up with news about which country is doing well and which country ought to have done better, the press often leaves out certain countries that are suffering worst than most but get little mention in the media. An essay written by Arundhati Roy in the Financial Times depicts how COVID-19 has impacted and is continuing to impact India.

 

Most of us have a choice, some don’t. Those who are immunosuppressed, vulnerable and sick at this present moment, do not have a choice. Should we not be grateful that we are still able to have the option to stay at home? Should we not be grateful to have a choice to be connected to the internet and be able to choose how we can be entertained, to learn, communicate and gain access to information. Perhaps next time when we feel that this whole isolation is getting too much for us, pause and think, what can we be grateful for?


If you have enjoyed this episode, kindly share this with your friends. For comments and suggestions, please write to psychchat@omnipsi.com or tweet to @psych_chat.

 

If you are interested to know more about what OmniPsi Consulting offers, please click on the link www.omnipsi.com.

 

If you are interested in my blog, you can click on this link www.draustintay.com

 

You can check out the details of Dr Simon Miles featured in this episode below

 

Company website – https://mywritingcoach.org/
Linkedin Profile – https://www.linkedin.com/in/drsimonmiles/

 

Copy of Untitled

 

The world today is very different from what it was last year. It is inevitable to be bombarded by news about the impact of COVID-19 outbreak. Most of us are taking this opportunity to get used to this new way of working. They are some who are using this unprecedented situation to sell their services; some are offering free webinars and then we have politicians still squabbling about who should take the blame.

 

From news avenue, we can see most people will abide by whatever measures their countries have imposed to curb the spreading of the COVID-19 virus but similarly we are also seeing others who are blatantly flouting the imposed measures. Why do people do that? People want to feel social and be part of a group even in this time where the spreading of the COVID-19 virus is so rampant. To some, preventing them to socialize is infringing their freedom.

 

We all have a part to play during this unprecedented time. Many people are struggling through this new environment. Many have also lost their lives as they succumbed to this disease. We might all be experiencing this whole outbreak differently, but one similar thing is we are all fearful. Our fears stem from not knowing enough about this disease, especially when there is still so much the experts are trying to figure out about the disease, and a vaccine is still not in sight.  While most of us cannot do much about this disease, we can work collectively to reduce the spike in the spreading of the disease. Be responsible and think about how our actions can impact others.

 

What can we do?  We need to look at changing our habits. Adapt to the changes. Start to use different ways to communicate. Why not use this time to reconnect with friends, spend more time with your loved ones (keeping social distancing wherever required) and also take time to reflect and recharge. Keeping yourself psychologically and physically fit will be essential. Choose whatever works for you.

 

If you are looking for additional tips or advice, please do send your message to austintay@omnipsi.com


If you have enjoyed this episode, kindly share this with your friends. For comments and suggestions, please write to psychchat@omnipsi.com or tweet to @psych_chat.

 

If you are interested to know more about what OmniPsi Consulting offers, please click on the link www.omnipsi.com.

 

If you are interested in my blog, you can click on this link www.draustintay.com

 

Some of the references shared in this episode are as follow:

Folkman, S., & Lazarus, R. S. (1985). If it changes it must be a process: A study of emotion and coping during three stages of a college examination. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 48, 150–170. doi:10.1037/0022-3514.48.1.150

 

Hershcovis, M. S., Turner, N., Barling, J., Arnold, K. A., Dupré, K. E., Inness, M., . . .Sivanathan, N. (2007). Predicting workplace aggression: A meta-analysis. Journal of Applied Psychology, 92, 228–238.

 

Penney, L. M., & Spector, P. E. (2005). Job stress, incivility, and counterproductive work behavior (CWB): The moderating role of negative affectivity. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 26, 777–796.

With the outbreak of Covid-19 increasing and spreading to many more countries, we are all advised to maintain hand hygiene to reduce the spread.  Prince Charles opted for a “namaste” instead of shaking hands at the Prince Trust’s Awards this week. This got me thinking. Since most of us are working from home and are continuing to collaborate with our colleagues through video conferencing, would it not be great to use another way to greet each other, since we are not able to shake hands. So instead of just a “Hello”, why not try something different.

 

Being based in Asia, I am exposed to three different ethnicities – Chinese, Malay and Indian. Each of these ethnicities has always used their own way to greet one another. The following are non-hand shaking greetings that you can try.

 

Chinese greeting

 

The half fist and palm salute is a standard greeting used by the Chinese. It is a form of greeting to show gratitude towards others and in traditional settings such as Chinese New Year. Although modern Chinese have started using handshakes, this type of Chinese greeting is a way to show respect towards others through distance (which I think is so appropriate at this time). There is a difference between men and women when it comes to the way this greeting is presented. For men, the left palm is placed over the right half fist, and for women, the right palm is placed over the left half fist.

 

chinese family greeting

 

Malay greeting

 

In the Malay tradition, the greeting is “Salam”. Both men and women will stretch their hands out, and you can lightly touch their hands and in return bring back one hand and place on your heart to indicate, ” I greet you with all my heart”.  Both men and women will offer their hands. It has to be noted that this greeting is not done towards the opposite sex (unless they are related). A simplified version is to use a hand on heart as a greeting which can be appropriate at this time.

 

Malay man greeting

 

Traditional Greeting

hand on heart

 

Simplified Greeting Version

 

Indian greeting

 

A standard greeting used by Indians is “Namaste”. This greeting is coupled with a slight bow and hands are pressed together and placed close to the heart. This gesture is also known as Anjali Mudra, a gesture also used in traditional ritual, yoga and dance.

 

namaste

 

 

As we are all trying our best to cope with the spread of the Covid-19, we should not forget to remain kind to one another.


If you have enjoyed this episode, kindly share this with your friends. For comments and suggestions, please write to psychchat@omnipsi.com or tweet to @psych_chat.

 

If you are interested to know more about what OmniPsi Consulting offers, please click on the link www.omnipsi.com.

 

If you are interested in my blog, you can click on this link www.draustintay.com

 

To effectively prevent workplace bullying, organizations need to ensure that they have a clear policy against workplace bullying. It is also essential that their employees are aware that such a policy is in place. Organizations can communicate this to their employees through the use of mediums such as notices, newsletters, internal memorandums and awareness campaigns. Training is essential for those who will be involved in dealing with complaints of workplace bullying, and these will include managers and HR personnel.

 

When organisations discuss workplace bullying openly and have processes and procedures to reduce and tackle workplace bullying, they will create a safe work environment for their employees.

 

Some of the references mentioned in this episode are as follow:

 

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-southkorea-labour/south-koreans-using-spy-gadgets-to-fight-workplace-bullying-idUSKCN1VO13I https://www.ladbible.com/news/news-man-cops-21000-fine-for-workplace-bullying-incident-20190829 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GSBNma0-ylg